How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company

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Izvoz citacije: ABNT
STARBEK, Marko ;GRUM, Janez ;DUHOVNIK, Jože ;KUŠAR, Janez .
How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 49, n.4, p. 200-217, november 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/how-to-achieve-a-competitive-position-with-a-small-company/>. Date accessed: 14 aug. 2020. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Starbek, M., Grum, J., Duhovnik, J., & Kušar, J.
(2003).
How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 49(4), 200-217.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
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	title = {How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {49},
	number = {4},
	year = {2003},
	keywords = {concurrent engineering; loops; team work; project teams; },
	abstract = {In 1991 the independence of Slovenia resulted in an enormous decrease in the domestic market for Slovenian companies. Big companies that did not adapt to the new conditions were destined to collapse. Several smaller companies were established, and they were more easily able to adapt to the new market conditions. When these companies entered the global market they encountered several difficulties, the most important of which was an excessively long time for product development. This paper presents the principle of the concurrent product development process. The market forces small companies to switch from sequential to concurrent engineering, and as team work is the basic element of concurrent engineering, special attention has to be paid to forming workgroups in the loops of the concurrent product development process in small companies. A survey of the published works in the field of planning teams in big companies ([1] and [2]) has revealed that in big companies a three-level team structure is recommended, as well as a workgroup consisting of four basic teams. An analysis of the three-level structure has led us to the conclusion that in small companies a two-level team structure and a workgroup consisting of two basic teams is to be preferred. The results of planning a two-level team structure and the implementation of concurrent engineering in a small company that produces mini-loaders are presented.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {200-217},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/how-to-achieve-a-competitive-position-with-a-small-company/}
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Starbek, M.,Grum, J.,Duhovnik, J.,Kušar, J.
2003 November 49. How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 49:4
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Starbek, Marko, Janez  Grum, Jože  Duhovnik, & Janez  Kušar.
"How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 49.4 (2003): 200-217. Web.  14 Aug. 2020
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AU  - Starbek, Marko 
AU  - Grum, Janez 
AU  - Duhovnik, Jože 
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TI  - How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - concurrent engineering; loops; team work; project teams; 
N2  - In 1991 the independence of Slovenia resulted in an enormous decrease in the domestic market for Slovenian companies. Big companies that did not adapt to the new conditions were destined to collapse. Several smaller companies were established, and they were more easily able to adapt to the new market conditions. When these companies entered the global market they encountered several difficulties, the most important of which was an excessively long time for product development. This paper presents the principle of the concurrent product development process. The market forces small companies to switch from sequential to concurrent engineering, and as team work is the basic element of concurrent engineering, special attention has to be paid to forming workgroups in the loops of the concurrent product development process in small companies. A survey of the published works in the field of planning teams in big companies ([1] and [2]) has revealed that in big companies a three-level team structure is recommended, as well as a workgroup consisting of four basic teams. An analysis of the three-level structure has led us to the conclusion that in small companies a two-level team structure and a workgroup consisting of two basic teams is to be preferred. The results of planning a two-level team structure and the implementation of concurrent engineering in a small company that produces mini-loaders are presented.
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	author = {Starbek, M., Grum, J., Duhovnik, J., Kušar, J.},
	title = {How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company},
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	volume = {49},
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TY  - JOUR
AU  - Starbek, Marko 
AU  - Grum, Janez 
AU  - Duhovnik, Jože 
AU  - Kušar, Janez 
PY  - 2017/11/11
TI  - How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company
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DO  - 
KW  - concurrent engineering, loops, team work, project teams, 
N2  - In 1991 the independence of Slovenia resulted in an enormous decrease in the domestic market for Slovenian companies. Big companies that did not adapt to the new conditions were destined to collapse. Several smaller companies were established, and they were more easily able to adapt to the new market conditions. When these companies entered the global market they encountered several difficulties, the most important of which was an excessively long time for product development. This paper presents the principle of the concurrent product development process. The market forces small companies to switch from sequential to concurrent engineering, and as team work is the basic element of concurrent engineering, special attention has to be paid to forming workgroups in the loops of the concurrent product development process in small companies. A survey of the published works in the field of planning teams in big companies ([1] and [2]) has revealed that in big companies a three-level team structure is recommended, as well as a workgroup consisting of four basic teams. An analysis of the three-level structure has led us to the conclusion that in small companies a two-level team structure and a workgroup consisting of two basic teams is to be preferred. The results of planning a two-level team structure and the implementation of concurrent engineering in a small company that produces mini-loaders are presented.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/how-to-achieve-a-competitive-position-with-a-small-company/
Starbek, Marko, Grum, Janez, Duhovnik, Jože, AND Kušar, Janez.
"How to Achieve a Competitive Position with a Small Company" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 49 Number 4 (11 November 2017)

Avtorji

Inštitucije

  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia

Informacije o papirju

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 49(2003)4, 200-217

In 1991 the independence of Slovenia resulted in an enormous decrease in the domestic market for Slovenian companies. Big companies that did not adapt to the new conditions were destined to collapse. Several smaller companies were established, and they were more easily able to adapt to the new market conditions. When these companies entered the global market they encountered several difficulties, the most important of which was an excessively long time for product development. This paper presents the principle of the concurrent product development process. The market forces small companies to switch from sequential to concurrent engineering, and as team work is the basic element of concurrent engineering, special attention has to be paid to forming workgroups in the loops of the concurrent product development process in small companies. A survey of the published works in the field of planning teams in big companies ([1] and [2]) has revealed that in big companies a three-level team structure is recommended, as well as a workgroup consisting of four basic teams. An analysis of the three-level structure has led us to the conclusion that in small companies a two-level team structure and a workgroup consisting of two basic teams is to be preferred. The results of planning a two-level team structure and the implementation of concurrent engineering in a small company that produces mini-loaders are presented.

concurrent engineering; loops; team work; project teams;