Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water

512 Ogledov
270 Prenosov
Izvoz citacije: ABNT
OSTERMAN, Aljaž ;DULAR, Matevž ;HOČEVAR, Marko ;ŠIROK, Brane .
Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 56, n.9, p. 527-534, october 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/>. Date accessed: 22 nov. 2019. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Osterman, A., Dular, M., Hočevar, M., & Širok, B.
(2010).
Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 56(9), 527-534.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
@article{.,
	author = {Aljaž  Osterman and Matevž  Dular and Marko  Hočevar and Brane  Širok},
	title = {Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {56},
	number = {9},
	year = {2010},
	keywords = {cavitation; ultrasound; temperature; IR thermography; bubbles; },
	abstract = {Although the thermal effects of cavitation are believed to be negligible for cavitation in water, they were successfully experimentally measured using infrared thermography. Cavitation was generated in a small container holding about 500 ml of water. It was oscillated with ultrasonic frequencies of 42 kHz to trigger growth and collapse of bubbles. For the temperature measurements a high-speed thermovision camera was used. It captures light in infrared spectrum with wavelength of 3-5 μm. The frequency of temperature field acquisition was set to 600 Hz. A silicon glass, which is transparent in the infrared light spectrum, was attached to a cylinder and partially submerged into water. Bubbles, which tend to appear in the vicinity of solid surface, appeared on the submerged side of the glass. The visual path for the thermovision camera was: air – silicon glass – water. In this way, the temperatures on the submerged side of the silicon glass where bubble growth and implosions occur could be measured. With the applied thermographic method small but distinctive local decreases of temperature (with magnitudes up to 0.3 K), caused by cavitation, were detected.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {527-534},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/}
}
Osterman, A.,Dular, M.,Hočevar, M.,Širok, B.
2010 October 56. Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 56:9
%A Osterman, Aljaž 
%A Dular, Matevž 
%A Hočevar, Marko 
%A Širok, Brane 
%D 2010
%T Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water
%B 2010
%9 cavitation; ultrasound; temperature; IR thermography; bubbles; 
%! Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water
%K cavitation; ultrasound; temperature; IR thermography; bubbles; 
%X Although the thermal effects of cavitation are believed to be negligible for cavitation in water, they were successfully experimentally measured using infrared thermography. Cavitation was generated in a small container holding about 500 ml of water. It was oscillated with ultrasonic frequencies of 42 kHz to trigger growth and collapse of bubbles. For the temperature measurements a high-speed thermovision camera was used. It captures light in infrared spectrum with wavelength of 3-5 μm. The frequency of temperature field acquisition was set to 600 Hz. A silicon glass, which is transparent in the infrared light spectrum, was attached to a cylinder and partially submerged into water. Bubbles, which tend to appear in the vicinity of solid surface, appeared on the submerged side of the glass. The visual path for the thermovision camera was: air – silicon glass – water. In this way, the temperatures on the submerged side of the silicon glass where bubble growth and implosions occur could be measured. With the applied thermographic method small but distinctive local decreases of temperature (with magnitudes up to 0.3 K), caused by cavitation, were detected.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/
%0 Journal Article
%R 
%& 527
%P 8
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 56
%N 9
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2017-10-24
%7 2017-10-24
Osterman, Aljaž, Matevž  Dular, Marko  Hočevar, & Brane  Širok.
"Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 56.9 (2010): 527-534. Web.  22 Nov. 2019
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Osterman, Aljaž 
AU  - Dular, Matevž 
AU  - Hočevar, Marko 
AU  - Širok, Brane 
PY  - 2010
TI  - Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - cavitation; ultrasound; temperature; IR thermography; bubbles; 
N2  - Although the thermal effects of cavitation are believed to be negligible for cavitation in water, they were successfully experimentally measured using infrared thermography. Cavitation was generated in a small container holding about 500 ml of water. It was oscillated with ultrasonic frequencies of 42 kHz to trigger growth and collapse of bubbles. For the temperature measurements a high-speed thermovision camera was used. It captures light in infrared spectrum with wavelength of 3-5 μm. The frequency of temperature field acquisition was set to 600 Hz. A silicon glass, which is transparent in the infrared light spectrum, was attached to a cylinder and partially submerged into water. Bubbles, which tend to appear in the vicinity of solid surface, appeared on the submerged side of the glass. The visual path for the thermovision camera was: air – silicon glass – water. In this way, the temperatures on the submerged side of the silicon glass where bubble growth and implosions occur could be measured. With the applied thermographic method small but distinctive local decreases of temperature (with magnitudes up to 0.3 K), caused by cavitation, were detected.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/
@article{{}{.},
	author = {Osterman, A., Dular, M., Hočevar, M., Širok, B.},
	title = {Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {56},
	number = {9},
	year = {2010},
	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Osterman, Aljaž 
AU  - Dular, Matevž 
AU  - Hočevar, Marko 
AU  - Širok, Brane 
PY  - 2017/10/24
TI  - Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 56, No 9 (2010): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - cavitation, ultrasound, temperature, IR thermography, bubbles, 
N2  - Although the thermal effects of cavitation are believed to be negligible for cavitation in water, they were successfully experimentally measured using infrared thermography. Cavitation was generated in a small container holding about 500 ml of water. It was oscillated with ultrasonic frequencies of 42 kHz to trigger growth and collapse of bubbles. For the temperature measurements a high-speed thermovision camera was used. It captures light in infrared spectrum with wavelength of 3-5 μm. The frequency of temperature field acquisition was set to 600 Hz. A silicon glass, which is transparent in the infrared light spectrum, was attached to a cylinder and partially submerged into water. Bubbles, which tend to appear in the vicinity of solid surface, appeared on the submerged side of the glass. The visual path for the thermovision camera was: air – silicon glass – water. In this way, the temperatures on the submerged side of the silicon glass where bubble growth and implosions occur could be measured. With the applied thermographic method small but distinctive local decreases of temperature (with magnitudes up to 0.3 K), caused by cavitation, were detected.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/infrared-thermography-of-cavitation-thermal-effects-in-water/
Osterman, Aljaž, Dular, Matevž, Hočevar, Marko, AND Širok, Brane.
"Infrared Thermography of Cavitation Thermal Effects in Water" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 56 Number 9 (24 October 2017)

Avtorji

Inštitucije

  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia

Informacije o papirju

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 56(2010)9, 527-534

Although the thermal effects of cavitation are believed to be negligible for cavitation in water, they were successfully experimentally measured using infrared thermography. Cavitation was generated in a small container holding about 500 ml of water. It was oscillated with ultrasonic frequencies of 42 kHz to trigger growth and collapse of bubbles. For the temperature measurements a high-speed thermovision camera was used. It captures light in infrared spectrum with wavelength of 3-5 μm. The frequency of temperature field acquisition was set to 600 Hz. A silicon glass, which is transparent in the infrared light spectrum, was attached to a cylinder and partially submerged into water. Bubbles, which tend to appear in the vicinity of solid surface, appeared on the submerged side of the glass. The visual path for the thermovision camera was: air – silicon glass – water. In this way, the temperatures on the submerged side of the silicon glass where bubble growth and implosions occur could be measured. With the applied thermographic method small but distinctive local decreases of temperature (with magnitudes up to 0.3 K), caused by cavitation, were detected.

cavitation; ultrasound; temperature; IR thermography; bubbles;