Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study

662 Ogledov
405 Prenosov
Izvoz citacije: ABNT
DEN DUNNEN, Steven ;KRAAIJ, Gert ;BISKUP, Christian ;KERKHOFFS, Gino M. M. J.;TUIJTHOF, Gabrielle J.M..
Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 59, n.7-8, p. 425-432, june 2018. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/>. Date accessed: 14 nov. 2019. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928.
den Dunnen, S., Kraaij, G., Biskup, C., Kerkhoffs, G., & Tuijthof, G.
(2013).
Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 59(7-8), 425-432.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928
@article{sv-jmesv-jme.2012.928,
	author = {Steven  den Dunnen and Gert  Kraaij and Christian  Biskup and Gino M. M. J. Kerkhoffs and Gabrielle J.M. Tuijthof},
	title = {Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {59},
	number = {7-8},
	year = {2013},
	keywords = {pure water jet; water jet drilling; drilling articular bone; orthopedic treatment; water pressure; blind holes},
	abstract = {The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind borings in the talar articular surface of cadaveric calcaneus bones of human, sheep, goats and pigs. A stand-off distance between 2.5 and 5.5 mm and a jet-time of 5 seconds were chosen. The depth of the holes was measured using a custom-adapted dial gauge. At least 30 MPa of water pressure is required to penetrate the human and goat specimens, and 50 MPa for the pig and sheep specimens. Overall, the machined holes were conically shaped and increased in depth with an increase of pressure. Above certain pressure levels, pure waterjets can be used for machining holes in articular bone, thereby opening a window for further research on pure waterjet drilling in orthopedics.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {425-432},	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/}
}
den Dunnen, S.,Kraaij, G.,Biskup, C.,Kerkhoffs, G.,Tuijthof, G.
2013 June 59. Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 59:7-8
%A den Dunnen, Steven 
%A Kraaij, Gert 
%A Biskup, Christian 
%A Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.
%A Tuijthof, Gabrielle J.M.
%D 2013
%T Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study
%B 2013
%9 pure water jet; water jet drilling; drilling articular bone; orthopedic treatment; water pressure; blind holes
%! Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study
%K pure water jet; water jet drilling; drilling articular bone; orthopedic treatment; water pressure; blind holes
%X The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind borings in the talar articular surface of cadaveric calcaneus bones of human, sheep, goats and pigs. A stand-off distance between 2.5 and 5.5 mm and a jet-time of 5 seconds were chosen. The depth of the holes was measured using a custom-adapted dial gauge. At least 30 MPa of water pressure is required to penetrate the human and goat specimens, and 50 MPa for the pig and sheep specimens. Overall, the machined holes were conically shaped and increased in depth with an increase of pressure. Above certain pressure levels, pure waterjets can be used for machining holes in articular bone, thereby opening a window for further research on pure waterjet drilling in orthopedics.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/
%0 Journal Article
%R 10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928
%& 425
%P 8
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 59
%N 7-8
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2018-06-28
%7 2018-06-28
den Dunnen, Steven, Gert  Kraaij, Christian  Biskup, Gino M. M. J. Kerkhoffs, & Gabrielle J.M. Tuijthof.
"Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 59.7-8 (2013): 425-432. Web.  14 Nov. 2019
TY  - JOUR
AU  - den Dunnen, Steven 
AU  - Kraaij, Gert 
AU  - Biskup, Christian 
AU  - Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.
AU  - Tuijthof, Gabrielle J.M.
PY  - 2013
TI  - Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928
KW  - pure water jet; water jet drilling; drilling articular bone; orthopedic treatment; water pressure; blind holes
N2  - The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind borings in the talar articular surface of cadaveric calcaneus bones of human, sheep, goats and pigs. A stand-off distance between 2.5 and 5.5 mm and a jet-time of 5 seconds were chosen. The depth of the holes was measured using a custom-adapted dial gauge. At least 30 MPa of water pressure is required to penetrate the human and goat specimens, and 50 MPa for the pig and sheep specimens. Overall, the machined holes were conically shaped and increased in depth with an increase of pressure. Above certain pressure levels, pure waterjets can be used for machining holes in articular bone, thereby opening a window for further research on pure waterjet drilling in orthopedics.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/
@article{{sv-jme}{sv-jme.2012.928},
	author = {den Dunnen, S., Kraaij, G., Biskup, C., Kerkhoffs, G., Tuijthof, G.},
	title = {Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {59},
	number = {7-8},
	year = {2013},
	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - den Dunnen, Steven 
AU  - Kraaij, Gert 
AU  - Biskup, Christian 
AU  - Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.
AU  - Tuijthof, Gabrielle J.M.
PY  - 2018/06/28
TI  - Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 59, No 7-8 (2013): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928
KW  - pure water jet, water jet drilling, drilling articular bone, orthopedic treatment, water pressure, blind holes
N2  - The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind borings in the talar articular surface of cadaveric calcaneus bones of human, sheep, goats and pigs. A stand-off distance between 2.5 and 5.5 mm and a jet-time of 5 seconds were chosen. The depth of the holes was measured using a custom-adapted dial gauge. At least 30 MPa of water pressure is required to penetrate the human and goat specimens, and 50 MPa for the pig and sheep specimens. Overall, the machined holes were conically shaped and increased in depth with an increase of pressure. Above certain pressure levels, pure waterjets can be used for machining holes in articular bone, thereby opening a window for further research on pure waterjet drilling in orthopedics.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/pure-waterjet-drilling-of-articular-bone-an-in-vitro-feasibility-study/
den Dunnen, Steven, Kraaij, Gert, Biskup, Christian, Kerkhoffs, Gino, AND Tuijthof, Gabrielle.
"Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone: an in vitro feasibility study" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 59 Number 7-8 (28 June 2018)

Avtorji

Inštitucije

  • Delft University of Technology 1
  • Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, The Netherlands 2, 5
  • (formerly)Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Materials Science, Germany 3
  • Academic Medical Center, Department Orthopedic Surgery, The Netherlands 4

Informacije o papirju

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 59(2013)7-8, 425-432

https://doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2012.928

The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind borings in the talar articular surface of cadaveric calcaneus bones of human, sheep, goats and pigs. A stand-off distance between 2.5 and 5.5 mm and a jet-time of 5 seconds were chosen. The depth of the holes was measured using a custom-adapted dial gauge. At least 30 MPa of water pressure is required to penetrate the human and goat specimens, and 50 MPa for the pig and sheep specimens. Overall, the machined holes were conically shaped and increased in depth with an increase of pressure. Above certain pressure levels, pure waterjets can be used for machining holes in articular bone, thereby opening a window for further research on pure waterjet drilling in orthopedics.

pure water jet; water jet drilling; drilling articular bone; orthopedic treatment; water pressure; blind holes