Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs

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Izvoz citacije: ABNT
KERMC, Mihael ;STADLER, Zmago ;KALIN, Mitjan .
Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 50, n.7-8, p. 346-359, july 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/>. Date accessed: 29 oct. 2020. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Kermc, M., Stadler, Z., & Kalin, M.
(2004).
Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 50(7-8), 346-359.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
@article{.,
	author = {Mihael  Kermc and Zmago  Stadler and Mitjan  Kalin},
	title = {Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {50},
	number = {7-8},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {brake discs; steel; C/C-SiC composite; surface temperature; },
	abstract = {Automotive braking systems normally employ conventional or ventilated brake discs and pads. In these systems the brake discs are made of steel or grey cast iron, which are paired with composite organic brake pads. Car manufacturers, however, are designing larger and heavier vehicles, with more powerful engines, which results in higher driving speeds and greater demands being placed on the frictional power of the brake systems. Improving the performance of a braking system requires either a larger conventional brake, which is not the best solution, or the use of new, improved brake-disc and pad materials. One such promising material for brake-disc applications is a C/C-SiC composite. However, despite its low wear rate and high frictional power, its use is still very limited because of the lack of an appropriate pad material that will perform well in combination with these discs under the conditions that are experienced with massproduction vehicles. One of the main reasons for this is the supposed high temperatures generated in these contacts. However, since this research is in its early stages and because of the particular materials and their combinations, relevant data on this topic cannot be obtained from the literature. Our first step in the development of a pad material for our own design of C/C-SiC composite discs was to determine the contact temperature and make a comparison with conventional steel discs under the same conditions. The evolution of the contact temperature was studied using two different testing machines and methods, where we simulated the dynamic braking conditions that are similar to those observed in real applications and under steady-state conditions. The differences could be explained by the thermal properties of the materials. All the experiments used the same pads, which were made from a metal-matrix composite to our own design.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {346-359},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/}
}
Kermc, M.,Stadler, Z.,Kalin, M.
2004 July 50. Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 50:7-8
%A Kermc, Mihael 
%A Stadler, Zmago 
%A Kalin, Mitjan 
%D 2004
%T Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs
%B 2004
%9 brake discs; steel; C/C-SiC composite; surface temperature; 
%! Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs
%K brake discs; steel; C/C-SiC composite; surface temperature; 
%X Automotive braking systems normally employ conventional or ventilated brake discs and pads. In these systems the brake discs are made of steel or grey cast iron, which are paired with composite organic brake pads. Car manufacturers, however, are designing larger and heavier vehicles, with more powerful engines, which results in higher driving speeds and greater demands being placed on the frictional power of the brake systems. Improving the performance of a braking system requires either a larger conventional brake, which is not the best solution, or the use of new, improved brake-disc and pad materials. One such promising material for brake-disc applications is a C/C-SiC composite. However, despite its low wear rate and high frictional power, its use is still very limited because of the lack of an appropriate pad material that will perform well in combination with these discs under the conditions that are experienced with massproduction vehicles. One of the main reasons for this is the supposed high temperatures generated in these contacts. However, since this research is in its early stages and because of the particular materials and their combinations, relevant data on this topic cannot be obtained from the literature. Our first step in the development of a pad material for our own design of C/C-SiC composite discs was to determine the contact temperature and make a comparison with conventional steel discs under the same conditions. The evolution of the contact temperature was studied using two different testing machines and methods, where we simulated the dynamic braking conditions that are similar to those observed in real applications and under steady-state conditions. The differences could be explained by the thermal properties of the materials. All the experiments used the same pads, which were made from a metal-matrix composite to our own design.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/
%0 Journal Article
%R 
%& 346
%P 14
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 50
%N 7-8
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2017-07-07
%7 2017-07-07
Kermc, Mihael, Zmago  Stadler, & Mitjan  Kalin.
"Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 50.7-8 (2004): 346-359. Web.  29 Oct. 2020
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Kermc, Mihael 
AU  - Stadler, Zmago 
AU  - Kalin, Mitjan 
PY  - 2004
TI  - Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - brake discs; steel; C/C-SiC composite; surface temperature; 
N2  - Automotive braking systems normally employ conventional or ventilated brake discs and pads. In these systems the brake discs are made of steel or grey cast iron, which are paired with composite organic brake pads. Car manufacturers, however, are designing larger and heavier vehicles, with more powerful engines, which results in higher driving speeds and greater demands being placed on the frictional power of the brake systems. Improving the performance of a braking system requires either a larger conventional brake, which is not the best solution, or the use of new, improved brake-disc and pad materials. One such promising material for brake-disc applications is a C/C-SiC composite. However, despite its low wear rate and high frictional power, its use is still very limited because of the lack of an appropriate pad material that will perform well in combination with these discs under the conditions that are experienced with massproduction vehicles. One of the main reasons for this is the supposed high temperatures generated in these contacts. However, since this research is in its early stages and because of the particular materials and their combinations, relevant data on this topic cannot be obtained from the literature. Our first step in the development of a pad material for our own design of C/C-SiC composite discs was to determine the contact temperature and make a comparison with conventional steel discs under the same conditions. The evolution of the contact temperature was studied using two different testing machines and methods, where we simulated the dynamic braking conditions that are similar to those observed in real applications and under steady-state conditions. The differences could be explained by the thermal properties of the materials. All the experiments used the same pads, which were made from a metal-matrix composite to our own design.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/
@article{{}{.},
	author = {Kermc, M., Stadler, Z., Kalin, M.},
	title = {Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {50},
	number = {7-8},
	year = {2004},
	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/}
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TY  - JOUR
AU  - Kermc, Mihael 
AU  - Stadler, Zmago 
AU  - Kalin, Mitjan 
PY  - 2017/07/07
TI  - Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 50, No 7-8 (2004): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - brake discs, steel, C/C-SiC composite, surface temperature, 
N2  - Automotive braking systems normally employ conventional or ventilated brake discs and pads. In these systems the brake discs are made of steel or grey cast iron, which are paired with composite organic brake pads. Car manufacturers, however, are designing larger and heavier vehicles, with more powerful engines, which results in higher driving speeds and greater demands being placed on the frictional power of the brake systems. Improving the performance of a braking system requires either a larger conventional brake, which is not the best solution, or the use of new, improved brake-disc and pad materials. One such promising material for brake-disc applications is a C/C-SiC composite. However, despite its low wear rate and high frictional power, its use is still very limited because of the lack of an appropriate pad material that will perform well in combination with these discs under the conditions that are experienced with massproduction vehicles. One of the main reasons for this is the supposed high temperatures generated in these contacts. However, since this research is in its early stages and because of the particular materials and their combinations, relevant data on this topic cannot be obtained from the literature. Our first step in the development of a pad material for our own design of C/C-SiC composite discs was to determine the contact temperature and make a comparison with conventional steel discs under the same conditions. The evolution of the contact temperature was studied using two different testing machines and methods, where we simulated the dynamic braking conditions that are similar to those observed in real applications and under steady-state conditions. The differences could be explained by the thermal properties of the materials. All the experiments used the same pads, which were made from a metal-matrix composite to our own design.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/sl/article/surface-temperatures-in-the-contacts-with-steel-and-cc-siccomposite-brake-discs/
Kermc, Mihael, Stadler, Zmago, AND Kalin, Mitjan.
"Surface Temperatures in the Contacts with Steel and C/C-SiCComposite Brake Discs" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 50 Number 7-8 (07 July 2017)

Avtorji

Inštitucije

  • MS Production, Bled, Slovenia
  • MS Production, Bled, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia

Informacije o papirju

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 50(2004)7-8, 346-359

Automotive braking systems normally employ conventional or ventilated brake discs and pads. In these systems the brake discs are made of steel or grey cast iron, which are paired with composite organic brake pads. Car manufacturers, however, are designing larger and heavier vehicles, with more powerful engines, which results in higher driving speeds and greater demands being placed on the frictional power of the brake systems. Improving the performance of a braking system requires either a larger conventional brake, which is not the best solution, or the use of new, improved brake-disc and pad materials. One such promising material for brake-disc applications is a C/C-SiC composite. However, despite its low wear rate and high frictional power, its use is still very limited because of the lack of an appropriate pad material that will perform well in combination with these discs under the conditions that are experienced with massproduction vehicles. One of the main reasons for this is the supposed high temperatures generated in these contacts. However, since this research is in its early stages and because of the particular materials and their combinations, relevant data on this topic cannot be obtained from the literature. Our first step in the development of a pad material for our own design of C/C-SiC composite discs was to determine the contact temperature and make a comparison with conventional steel discs under the same conditions. The evolution of the contact temperature was studied using two different testing machines and methods, where we simulated the dynamic braking conditions that are similar to those observed in real applications and under steady-state conditions. The differences could be explained by the thermal properties of the materials. All the experiments used the same pads, which were made from a metal-matrix composite to our own design.

brake discs; steel; C/C-SiC composite; surface temperature;