An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing

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VUJICA HERZOG, Natasa ;TONCHIA, Stefano .
An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 60, n.12, p. 797-803, june 2018. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/>. Date accessed: 15 sep. 2019. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873.
Vujica Herzog, N., & Tonchia, S.
(2014).
An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 60(12), 797-803.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873
@article{sv-jmesv-jme.2014.1873,
	author = {Natasa  Vujica Herzog and Stefano  Tonchia},
	title = {An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {60},
	number = {12},
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research},
	abstract = {Despite lean thinking being a broadly accepted approach, there is still some confusion within present terminology regarding ‘lean’ and its issues. This paper presents the results of a research survey carried out within 72 medium and large-sized Slovenian manufacturing companies. The sample selection criteria adopted, together with the research items investigated, ensured a generic framework for our research. Eight crucial areas were identified based on a synthesis of ‘lean’ literature for assessing and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems: value concept and customers, value stream mapping (VSM), pull/kanban and flow, waste elimination, productive maintenance, just-in-time (JIT), employee involvement and the development of excellent suppliers (lean suppliers). Variables were constructed within these areas using Likert scales, and statistical validity and reliability analyses. For example, when measuring the developments of excellent suppliers the focus should be on three variables: on time deliveries, supplier relationships, and a skilled and loyal supplier. The results show that the developed variables can be important both for understanding ‘lean’ and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {797-803},	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/}
}
Vujica Herzog, N.,Tonchia, S.
2014 June 60. An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 60:12
%A Vujica Herzog, Natasa 
%A Tonchia, Stefano 
%D 2014
%T An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing
%B 2014
%9 Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research
%! An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing
%K Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research
%X Despite lean thinking being a broadly accepted approach, there is still some confusion within present terminology regarding ‘lean’ and its issues. This paper presents the results of a research survey carried out within 72 medium and large-sized Slovenian manufacturing companies. The sample selection criteria adopted, together with the research items investigated, ensured a generic framework for our research. Eight crucial areas were identified based on a synthesis of ‘lean’ literature for assessing and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems: value concept and customers, value stream mapping (VSM), pull/kanban and flow, waste elimination, productive maintenance, just-in-time (JIT), employee involvement and the development of excellent suppliers (lean suppliers). Variables were constructed within these areas using Likert scales, and statistical validity and reliability analyses. For example, when measuring the developments of excellent suppliers the focus should be on three variables: on time deliveries, supplier relationships, and a skilled and loyal supplier. The results show that the developed variables can be important both for understanding ‘lean’ and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/
%0 Journal Article
%R 10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873
%& 797
%P 7
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 60
%N 12
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2018-06-28
%7 2018-06-28
Vujica Herzog, Natasa, & Stefano  Tonchia.
"An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 60.12 (2014): 797-803. Web.  15 Sep. 2019
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Vujica Herzog, Natasa 
AU  - Tonchia, Stefano 
PY  - 2014
TI  - An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873
KW  - Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research
N2  - Despite lean thinking being a broadly accepted approach, there is still some confusion within present terminology regarding ‘lean’ and its issues. This paper presents the results of a research survey carried out within 72 medium and large-sized Slovenian manufacturing companies. The sample selection criteria adopted, together with the research items investigated, ensured a generic framework for our research. Eight crucial areas were identified based on a synthesis of ‘lean’ literature for assessing and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems: value concept and customers, value stream mapping (VSM), pull/kanban and flow, waste elimination, productive maintenance, just-in-time (JIT), employee involvement and the development of excellent suppliers (lean suppliers). Variables were constructed within these areas using Likert scales, and statistical validity and reliability analyses. For example, when measuring the developments of excellent suppliers the focus should be on three variables: on time deliveries, supplier relationships, and a skilled and loyal supplier. The results show that the developed variables can be important both for understanding ‘lean’ and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/
@article{{sv-jme}{sv-jme.2014.1873},
	author = {Vujica Herzog, N., Tonchia, S.},
	title = {An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {60},
	number = {12},
	year = {2014},
	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Vujica Herzog, Natasa 
AU  - Tonchia, Stefano 
PY  - 2018/06/28
TI  - An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 60, No 12 (2014): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873
KW  - Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research
N2  - Despite lean thinking being a broadly accepted approach, there is still some confusion within present terminology regarding ‘lean’ and its issues. This paper presents the results of a research survey carried out within 72 medium and large-sized Slovenian manufacturing companies. The sample selection criteria adopted, together with the research items investigated, ensured a generic framework for our research. Eight crucial areas were identified based on a synthesis of ‘lean’ literature for assessing and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems: value concept and customers, value stream mapping (VSM), pull/kanban and flow, waste elimination, productive maintenance, just-in-time (JIT), employee involvement and the development of excellent suppliers (lean suppliers). Variables were constructed within these areas using Likert scales, and statistical validity and reliability analyses. For example, when measuring the developments of excellent suppliers the focus should be on three variables: on time deliveries, supplier relationships, and a skilled and loyal supplier. The results show that the developed variables can be important both for understanding ‘lean’ and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/an-instrument-for-measuring-the-degree-of-lean-implementation-in-manufacturing/
Vujica Herzog, Natasa, AND Tonchia, Stefano.
"An Instrument for Measuring the Degree of Lean Implementation in Manufacturing" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 60 Number 12 (28 June 2018)

Authors

Affiliations

  • University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • Universitiy of Udine, Department of Electrical, Managerial and Mechanical Engineering, Italy

Paper's information

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 60(2014)12, 797-803

10.5545/sv-jme.2014.1873

Despite lean thinking being a broadly accepted approach, there is still some confusion within present terminology regarding ‘lean’ and its issues. This paper presents the results of a research survey carried out within 72 medium and large-sized Slovenian manufacturing companies. The sample selection criteria adopted, together with the research items investigated, ensured a generic framework for our research. Eight crucial areas were identified based on a synthesis of ‘lean’ literature for assessing and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems: value concept and customers, value stream mapping (VSM), pull/kanban and flow, waste elimination, productive maintenance, just-in-time (JIT), employee involvement and the development of excellent suppliers (lean suppliers). Variables were constructed within these areas using Likert scales, and statistical validity and reliability analyses. For example, when measuring the developments of excellent suppliers the focus should be on three variables: on time deliveries, supplier relationships, and a skilled and loyal supplier. The results show that the developed variables can be important both for understanding ‘lean’ and measuring the degree of lean implementation within existing manufacturing systems.

Lean manufacturing, Lean implementation, Survey research