Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method

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KRESE, Gorazd ;PREK, Matjaž ;BUTALA, Vincenc .
Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 58, n.2, p. 107-114, june 2018. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/>. Date accessed: 19 feb. 2020. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160.
Krese, G., Prek, M., & Butala, V.
(2012).
Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 58(2), 107-114.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160
@article{sv-jmesv-jme.2011.160,
	author = {Gorazd  Krese and Matjaž  Prek and Vincenc  Butala},
	title = {Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {58},
	number = {2},
	year = {2012},
	keywords = {building electric energy consumption; cooling degree day; base temperature; latent load; wet-bulb temperature},
	abstract = {In cases where a quick insight into the operation of an HVAC system is more important than accuracy, cooling degree days can be used for monitoring electric energy consumption dependent on meteorological conditions. Cooling degree days are calculated from differences between outdoor temperatures above the base temperature and the base temperature itself, therefore containing both climate and building information. The difficulties in applying this method are the determination of base temperature and choosing a procedure for calculating degree days, which vary depending on the resolution of the weather data used. In addition, the cooling degree method has a major flaw, i.e. it considers only a linear dependence between cooling energy consumption and sensible cooling load, thereby ignoring latent loads, which become more significant at higher outdoor temperatures. In this article an analysis of real electric energy consumption data using the cooling degree method and an improved method derived from it that includes latent loads, as well as a comparison between them, are shown. Both methods are applied several times to metered data, each time with a different combination of a method for determining base temperature and a degree day calculation technique.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {107-114},	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/}
}
Krese, G.,Prek, M.,Butala, V.
2012 June 58. Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 58:2
%A Krese, Gorazd 
%A Prek, Matjaž 
%A Butala, Vincenc 
%D 2012
%T Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method
%B 2012
%9 building electric energy consumption; cooling degree day; base temperature; latent load; wet-bulb temperature
%! Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method
%K building electric energy consumption; cooling degree day; base temperature; latent load; wet-bulb temperature
%X In cases where a quick insight into the operation of an HVAC system is more important than accuracy, cooling degree days can be used for monitoring electric energy consumption dependent on meteorological conditions. Cooling degree days are calculated from differences between outdoor temperatures above the base temperature and the base temperature itself, therefore containing both climate and building information. The difficulties in applying this method are the determination of base temperature and choosing a procedure for calculating degree days, which vary depending on the resolution of the weather data used. In addition, the cooling degree method has a major flaw, i.e. it considers only a linear dependence between cooling energy consumption and sensible cooling load, thereby ignoring latent loads, which become more significant at higher outdoor temperatures. In this article an analysis of real electric energy consumption data using the cooling degree method and an improved method derived from it that includes latent loads, as well as a comparison between them, are shown. Both methods are applied several times to metered data, each time with a different combination of a method for determining base temperature and a degree day calculation technique.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/
%0 Journal Article
%R 10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160
%& 107
%P 8
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 58
%N 2
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2018-06-28
%7 2018-06-28
Krese, Gorazd, Matjaž  Prek, & Vincenc  Butala.
"Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 58.2 (2012): 107-114. Web.  19 Feb. 2020
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Krese, Gorazd 
AU  - Prek, Matjaž 
AU  - Butala, Vincenc 
PY  - 2012
TI  - Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160
KW  - building electric energy consumption; cooling degree day; base temperature; latent load; wet-bulb temperature
N2  - In cases where a quick insight into the operation of an HVAC system is more important than accuracy, cooling degree days can be used for monitoring electric energy consumption dependent on meteorological conditions. Cooling degree days are calculated from differences between outdoor temperatures above the base temperature and the base temperature itself, therefore containing both climate and building information. The difficulties in applying this method are the determination of base temperature and choosing a procedure for calculating degree days, which vary depending on the resolution of the weather data used. In addition, the cooling degree method has a major flaw, i.e. it considers only a linear dependence between cooling energy consumption and sensible cooling load, thereby ignoring latent loads, which become more significant at higher outdoor temperatures. In this article an analysis of real electric energy consumption data using the cooling degree method and an improved method derived from it that includes latent loads, as well as a comparison between them, are shown. Both methods are applied several times to metered data, each time with a different combination of a method for determining base temperature and a degree day calculation technique.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/
@article{{sv-jme}{sv-jme.2011.160},
	author = {Krese, G., Prek, M., Butala, V.},
	title = {Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {58},
	number = {2},
	year = {2012},
	doi = {10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Krese, Gorazd 
AU  - Prek, Matjaž 
AU  - Butala, Vincenc 
PY  - 2018/06/28
TI  - Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 58, No 2 (2012): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160
KW  - building electric energy consumption, cooling degree day, base temperature, latent load, wet-bulb temperature
N2  - In cases where a quick insight into the operation of an HVAC system is more important than accuracy, cooling degree days can be used for monitoring electric energy consumption dependent on meteorological conditions. Cooling degree days are calculated from differences between outdoor temperatures above the base temperature and the base temperature itself, therefore containing both climate and building information. The difficulties in applying this method are the determination of base temperature and choosing a procedure for calculating degree days, which vary depending on the resolution of the weather data used. In addition, the cooling degree method has a major flaw, i.e. it considers only a linear dependence between cooling energy consumption and sensible cooling load, thereby ignoring latent loads, which become more significant at higher outdoor temperatures. In this article an analysis of real electric energy consumption data using the cooling degree method and an improved method derived from it that includes latent loads, as well as a comparison between them, are shown. Both methods are applied several times to metered data, each time with a different combination of a method for determining base temperature and a degree day calculation technique.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/analysis-of-building-electric-energy-consumption-data-using-an-improved-cooling-degree-day-method/
Krese, Gorazd, Prek, Matjaž, AND Butala, Vincenc.
"Analysis of Building Electric Energy Consumption Data Using an Improved Cooling Degree Day Method" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 58 Number 2 (28 June 2018)

Authors

Affiliations

  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia 1

Paper's information

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 58(2012)2, 107-114

https://doi.org/10.5545/sv-jme.2011.160

In cases where a quick insight into the operation of an HVAC system is more important than accuracy, cooling degree days can be used for monitoring electric energy consumption dependent on meteorological conditions. Cooling degree days are calculated from differences between outdoor temperatures above the base temperature and the base temperature itself, therefore containing both climate and building information. The difficulties in applying this method are the determination of base temperature and choosing a procedure for calculating degree days, which vary depending on the resolution of the weather data used. In addition, the cooling degree method has a major flaw, i.e. it considers only a linear dependence between cooling energy consumption and sensible cooling load, thereby ignoring latent loads, which become more significant at higher outdoor temperatures. In this article an analysis of real electric energy consumption data using the cooling degree method and an improved method derived from it that includes latent loads, as well as a comparison between them, are shown. Both methods are applied several times to metered data, each time with a different combination of a method for determining base temperature and a degree day calculation technique.

building electric energy consumption; cooling degree day; base temperature; latent load; wet-bulb temperature