Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles

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GERICKE, Bernd ;KESSEL, Standard ;PERKAVEC, Marko .
Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 42, n.3-4, p. 140-149, july 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/>. Date accessed: 27 jan. 2021. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Gericke, B., Kessel, S., & Perkavec, M.
(1996).
Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 42(3-4), 140-149.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
@article{.,
	author = {Bernd  Gericke and Standard  Kessel and Marko  Perkavec},
	title = {Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {42},
	number = {3-4},
	year = {1996},
	keywords = {Heat Shifting Systems; Gas Turbine Cycles; },
	abstract = {With an increasing degree of industrialisation and simultaneous electrification, fossil fuel consumption has increased constantly this century. Over the last hundred years the combustion of fossil fuels has caused an increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere of about 25%, making the greenhouse effect a critical issue. In order for the world to avoid a climatic catastrophe, industrial countries, being the most responsible for the greenhouse effect, will have to drastically reduce CO2 emissions. With the increasing need for electrical power predicted for the coming years it will be possible to achieve the required reduction of CO2 emissions only through consistent conservation of energy and a considerable increase in the efficiency of all consuming devices as well as thermal power plants. Modern combined gas and steam cycles enable increased efficiency, while the cogeneration of electrical power and heat enables the required high fuel conversion rate. New technologies will have to be developed for the cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. In operation oriented towards the production of heat, low demand for heat in summer will cause non-economical operation of the plant at partial loads, while operation directed towards the production of electrical power will require the release of waste heat into the atmosphere. Using a simple cycle gas turbine, heat shifting systems provide great independence of operation over a wide range of demands for electricity and heat. With modern heat exchangers, the old principle of regeneration is again becoming interesting. With a variable operation of a heat exchanger, it will be possible to produce more heat or more electricity from consumed fuel, depending on demand. With an appropriate design, it will be possible to achieve an increase in efficiency of up to 25 %.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {140-149},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/}
}
Gericke, B.,Kessel, S.,Perkavec, M.
1996 July 42. Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 42:3-4
%A Gericke, Bernd 
%A Kessel, Standard 
%A Perkavec, Marko 
%D 1996
%T Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles
%B 1996
%9 Heat Shifting Systems; Gas Turbine Cycles; 
%! Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles
%K Heat Shifting Systems; Gas Turbine Cycles; 
%X With an increasing degree of industrialisation and simultaneous electrification, fossil fuel consumption has increased constantly this century. Over the last hundred years the combustion of fossil fuels has caused an increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere of about 25%, making the greenhouse effect a critical issue. In order for the world to avoid a climatic catastrophe, industrial countries, being the most responsible for the greenhouse effect, will have to drastically reduce CO2 emissions. With the increasing need for electrical power predicted for the coming years it will be possible to achieve the required reduction of CO2 emissions only through consistent conservation of energy and a considerable increase in the efficiency of all consuming devices as well as thermal power plants. Modern combined gas and steam cycles enable increased efficiency, while the cogeneration of electrical power and heat enables the required high fuel conversion rate. New technologies will have to be developed for the cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. In operation oriented towards the production of heat, low demand for heat in summer will cause non-economical operation of the plant at partial loads, while operation directed towards the production of electrical power will require the release of waste heat into the atmosphere. Using a simple cycle gas turbine, heat shifting systems provide great independence of operation over a wide range of demands for electricity and heat. With modern heat exchangers, the old principle of regeneration is again becoming interesting. With a variable operation of a heat exchanger, it will be possible to produce more heat or more electricity from consumed fuel, depending on demand. With an appropriate design, it will be possible to achieve an increase in efficiency of up to 25 %.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/
%0 Journal Article
%R 
%& 140
%P 10
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 42
%N 3-4
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2017-07-06
%7 2017-07-06
Gericke, Bernd, Standard  Kessel, & Marko  Perkavec.
"Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 42.3-4 (1996): 140-149. Web.  27 Jan. 2021
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Gericke, Bernd 
AU  - Kessel, Standard 
AU  - Perkavec, Marko 
PY  - 1996
TI  - Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - Heat Shifting Systems; Gas Turbine Cycles; 
N2  - With an increasing degree of industrialisation and simultaneous electrification, fossil fuel consumption has increased constantly this century. Over the last hundred years the combustion of fossil fuels has caused an increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere of about 25%, making the greenhouse effect a critical issue. In order for the world to avoid a climatic catastrophe, industrial countries, being the most responsible for the greenhouse effect, will have to drastically reduce CO2 emissions. With the increasing need for electrical power predicted for the coming years it will be possible to achieve the required reduction of CO2 emissions only through consistent conservation of energy and a considerable increase in the efficiency of all consuming devices as well as thermal power plants. Modern combined gas and steam cycles enable increased efficiency, while the cogeneration of electrical power and heat enables the required high fuel conversion rate. New technologies will have to be developed for the cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. In operation oriented towards the production of heat, low demand for heat in summer will cause non-economical operation of the plant at partial loads, while operation directed towards the production of electrical power will require the release of waste heat into the atmosphere. Using a simple cycle gas turbine, heat shifting systems provide great independence of operation over a wide range of demands for electricity and heat. With modern heat exchangers, the old principle of regeneration is again becoming interesting. With a variable operation of a heat exchanger, it will be possible to produce more heat or more electricity from consumed fuel, depending on demand. With an appropriate design, it will be possible to achieve an increase in efficiency of up to 25 %.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/
@article{{}{.},
	author = {Gericke, B., Kessel, S., Perkavec, M.},
	title = {Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {42},
	number = {3-4},
	year = {1996},
	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Gericke, Bernd 
AU  - Kessel, Standard 
AU  - Perkavec, Marko 
PY  - 2017/07/06
TI  - Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 42, No 3-4 (1996): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - Heat Shifting Systems, Gas Turbine Cycles, 
N2  - With an increasing degree of industrialisation and simultaneous electrification, fossil fuel consumption has increased constantly this century. Over the last hundred years the combustion of fossil fuels has caused an increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere of about 25%, making the greenhouse effect a critical issue. In order for the world to avoid a climatic catastrophe, industrial countries, being the most responsible for the greenhouse effect, will have to drastically reduce CO2 emissions. With the increasing need for electrical power predicted for the coming years it will be possible to achieve the required reduction of CO2 emissions only through consistent conservation of energy and a considerable increase in the efficiency of all consuming devices as well as thermal power plants. Modern combined gas and steam cycles enable increased efficiency, while the cogeneration of electrical power and heat enables the required high fuel conversion rate. New technologies will have to be developed for the cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. In operation oriented towards the production of heat, low demand for heat in summer will cause non-economical operation of the plant at partial loads, while operation directed towards the production of electrical power will require the release of waste heat into the atmosphere. Using a simple cycle gas turbine, heat shifting systems provide great independence of operation over a wide range of demands for electricity and heat. With modern heat exchangers, the old principle of regeneration is again becoming interesting. With a variable operation of a heat exchanger, it will be possible to produce more heat or more electricity from consumed fuel, depending on demand. With an appropriate design, it will be possible to achieve an increase in efficiency of up to 25 %.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/heat-shifting-systems-in-gas-turbine-cycles/
Gericke, Bernd, Kessel, Standard, AND Perkavec, Marko.
"Heat Shifting Systems in Gas Turbine Cycles" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 42 Number 3-4 (06 July 2017)

Authors

Affiliations

  • European Gas Turbines, Essen, Germany
  • European Gas Turbines, Essen, Germany
  • European Gas Turbines, Essen, Germany

Paper's information

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 42(1996)3-4, 140-149

With an increasing degree of industrialisation and simultaneous electrification, fossil fuel consumption has increased constantly this century. Over the last hundred years the combustion of fossil fuels has caused an increase in the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere of about 25%, making the greenhouse effect a critical issue. In order for the world to avoid a climatic catastrophe, industrial countries, being the most responsible for the greenhouse effect, will have to drastically reduce CO2 emissions. With the increasing need for electrical power predicted for the coming years it will be possible to achieve the required reduction of CO2 emissions only through consistent conservation of energy and a considerable increase in the efficiency of all consuming devices as well as thermal power plants. Modern combined gas and steam cycles enable increased efficiency, while the cogeneration of electrical power and heat enables the required high fuel conversion rate. New technologies will have to be developed for the cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. In operation oriented towards the production of heat, low demand for heat in summer will cause non-economical operation of the plant at partial loads, while operation directed towards the production of electrical power will require the release of waste heat into the atmosphere. Using a simple cycle gas turbine, heat shifting systems provide great independence of operation over a wide range of demands for electricity and heat. With modern heat exchangers, the old principle of regeneration is again becoming interesting. With a variable operation of a heat exchanger, it will be possible to produce more heat or more electricity from consumed fuel, depending on demand. With an appropriate design, it will be possible to achieve an increase in efficiency of up to 25 %.

Heat Shifting Systems; Gas Turbine Cycles;