Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process

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BUČAR, Tomaž ;JANEŽIČ, Miha ;PANGERŠIČ, Primož ;FAJDIGA, Matija .
Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 50, n.2, p. 80-93, july 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/introducing-numerical-analyses-in-the-early-phases-of-the-design-process/>. Date accessed: 07 apr. 2020. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Bučar, T., Janežič, M., Pangeršič, P., & Fajdiga, M.
(2004).
Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 50(2), 80-93.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
@article{.,
	author = {Tomaž  Bučar and Miha  Janežič and Primož  Pangeršič and Matija  Fajdiga},
	title = {Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {50},
	number = {2},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {product design; CAD; finite element method; experiment planning; },
	abstract = {Decisions made during the product development process have a significant influence on factors such as costs, performance, reliability, safety and the environmental impact of a product. However, since the knowledge of all the design requirements and constraints during this early phase of a product’s life cycle is usually imprecise, approximate or unknown, the designer’s decision-making is a very demanding task. Faced with such complexity, individual designers have restricted themselves to narrow, well-defined sub-tasks and, as a result, progress in this area has been patchy and spasmodic. In many cases, product design has been improved by the help of computer-aided design (CAD) and structural analyses based on the finite-element method (FEM). These two methods, coupled together, allow the calculation of mechanical quantities (such as stresses, deformations and contact pressures) and the investigation of the different behaviour of products with various designs. Such quantities can also be measured by means of in-vitro tests, but the advantage of CAD-FEM is the possibility of changing the geometrical and material properties of the product and evaluating its different behaviour before manufacturing prototypes. However, because the numerical models are based on many suppositions and restrictions, without proper interpretation the finite-element analysis (FEA) results are also of almost no use. Thus, in this article a method of acquiring a reference database, which serves for FEA results validation, is suggested. The procedure of building a suitable reference database is demonstrated by means of two examples, a car’s handbrake and brake pedal. },
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {80-93},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/introducing-numerical-analyses-in-the-early-phases-of-the-design-process/}
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Bučar, T.,Janežič, M.,Pangeršič, P.,Fajdiga, M.
2004 July 50. Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 50:2
%A Bučar, Tomaž 
%A Janežič, Miha 
%A Pangeršič, Primož 
%A Fajdiga, Matija 
%D 2004
%T Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process
%B 2004
%9 product design; CAD; finite element method; experiment planning; 
%! Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process
%K product design; CAD; finite element method; experiment planning; 
%X Decisions made during the product development process have a significant influence on factors such as costs, performance, reliability, safety and the environmental impact of a product. However, since the knowledge of all the design requirements and constraints during this early phase of a product’s life cycle is usually imprecise, approximate or unknown, the designer’s decision-making is a very demanding task. Faced with such complexity, individual designers have restricted themselves to narrow, well-defined sub-tasks and, as a result, progress in this area has been patchy and spasmodic. In many cases, product design has been improved by the help of computer-aided design (CAD) and structural analyses based on the finite-element method (FEM). These two methods, coupled together, allow the calculation of mechanical quantities (such as stresses, deformations and contact pressures) and the investigation of the different behaviour of products with various designs. Such quantities can also be measured by means of in-vitro tests, but the advantage of CAD-FEM is the possibility of changing the geometrical and material properties of the product and evaluating its different behaviour before manufacturing prototypes. However, because the numerical models are based on many suppositions and restrictions, without proper interpretation the finite-element analysis (FEA) results are also of almost no use. Thus, in this article a method of acquiring a reference database, which serves for FEA results validation, is suggested. The procedure of building a suitable reference database is demonstrated by means of two examples, a car’s handbrake and brake pedal. 
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/introducing-numerical-analyses-in-the-early-phases-of-the-design-process/
%0 Journal Article
%R 
%& 80
%P 14
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 50
%N 2
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2017-07-07
%7 2017-07-07
Bučar, Tomaž, Miha  Janežič, Primož  Pangeršič, & Matija  Fajdiga.
"Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 50.2 (2004): 80-93. Web.  07 Apr. 2020
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bučar, Tomaž 
AU  - Janežič, Miha 
AU  - Pangeršič, Primož 
AU  - Fajdiga, Matija 
PY  - 2004
TI  - Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - product design; CAD; finite element method; experiment planning; 
N2  - Decisions made during the product development process have a significant influence on factors such as costs, performance, reliability, safety and the environmental impact of a product. However, since the knowledge of all the design requirements and constraints during this early phase of a product’s life cycle is usually imprecise, approximate or unknown, the designer’s decision-making is a very demanding task. Faced with such complexity, individual designers have restricted themselves to narrow, well-defined sub-tasks and, as a result, progress in this area has been patchy and spasmodic. In many cases, product design has been improved by the help of computer-aided design (CAD) and structural analyses based on the finite-element method (FEM). These two methods, coupled together, allow the calculation of mechanical quantities (such as stresses, deformations and contact pressures) and the investigation of the different behaviour of products with various designs. Such quantities can also be measured by means of in-vitro tests, but the advantage of CAD-FEM is the possibility of changing the geometrical and material properties of the product and evaluating its different behaviour before manufacturing prototypes. However, because the numerical models are based on many suppositions and restrictions, without proper interpretation the finite-element analysis (FEA) results are also of almost no use. Thus, in this article a method of acquiring a reference database, which serves for FEA results validation, is suggested. The procedure of building a suitable reference database is demonstrated by means of two examples, a car’s handbrake and brake pedal. 
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/introducing-numerical-analyses-in-the-early-phases-of-the-design-process/
@article{{}{.},
	author = {Bučar, T., Janežič, M., Pangeršič, P., Fajdiga, M.},
	title = {Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process},
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	volume = {50},
	number = {2},
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TY  - JOUR
AU  - Bučar, Tomaž 
AU  - Janežič, Miha 
AU  - Pangeršič, Primož 
AU  - Fajdiga, Matija 
PY  - 2017/07/07
TI  - Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 50, No 2 (2004): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - product design, CAD, finite element method, experiment planning, 
N2  - Decisions made during the product development process have a significant influence on factors such as costs, performance, reliability, safety and the environmental impact of a product. However, since the knowledge of all the design requirements and constraints during this early phase of a product’s life cycle is usually imprecise, approximate or unknown, the designer’s decision-making is a very demanding task. Faced with such complexity, individual designers have restricted themselves to narrow, well-defined sub-tasks and, as a result, progress in this area has been patchy and spasmodic. In many cases, product design has been improved by the help of computer-aided design (CAD) and structural analyses based on the finite-element method (FEM). These two methods, coupled together, allow the calculation of mechanical quantities (such as stresses, deformations and contact pressures) and the investigation of the different behaviour of products with various designs. Such quantities can also be measured by means of in-vitro tests, but the advantage of CAD-FEM is the possibility of changing the geometrical and material properties of the product and evaluating its different behaviour before manufacturing prototypes. However, because the numerical models are based on many suppositions and restrictions, without proper interpretation the finite-element analysis (FEA) results are also of almost no use. Thus, in this article a method of acquiring a reference database, which serves for FEA results validation, is suggested. The procedure of building a suitable reference database is demonstrated by means of two examples, a car’s handbrake and brake pedal. 
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/introducing-numerical-analyses-in-the-early-phases-of-the-design-process/
Bučar, Tomaž, Janežič, Miha, Pangeršič, Primož, AND Fajdiga, Matija.
"Introducing Numerical Analyses in the Early Phases of the Design Process" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 50 Number 2 (07 July 2017)

Authors

Affiliations

  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Slovenia

Paper's information

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 50(2004)2, 80-93

Decisions made during the product development process have a significant influence on factors such as costs, performance, reliability, safety and the environmental impact of a product. However, since the knowledge of all the design requirements and constraints during this early phase of a product’s life cycle is usually imprecise, approximate or unknown, the designer’s decision-making is a very demanding task. Faced with such complexity, individual designers have restricted themselves to narrow, well-defined sub-tasks and, as a result, progress in this area has been patchy and spasmodic. In many cases, product design has been improved by the help of computer-aided design (CAD) and structural analyses based on the finite-element method (FEM). These two methods, coupled together, allow the calculation of mechanical quantities (such as stresses, deformations and contact pressures) and the investigation of the different behaviour of products with various designs. Such quantities can also be measured by means of in-vitro tests, but the advantage of CAD-FEM is the possibility of changing the geometrical and material properties of the product and evaluating its different behaviour before manufacturing prototypes. However, because the numerical models are based on many suppositions and restrictions, without proper interpretation the finite-element analysis (FEA) results are also of almost no use. Thus, in this article a method of acquiring a reference database, which serves for FEA results validation, is suggested. The procedure of building a suitable reference database is demonstrated by means of two examples, a car’s handbrake and brake pedal. 

product design; CAD; finite element method; experiment planning;