Network Flow Tracing

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PANTOŠ, Miloš ;GUBINA, Ferdinand .
Network Flow Tracing. 
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, [S.l.], v. 49, n.5, p. 267-274, july 2017. 
ISSN 0039-2480.
Available at: <https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/>. Date accessed: 27 jan. 2021. 
doi:http://dx.doi.org/.
Pantoš, M., & Gubina, F.
(2003).
Network Flow Tracing.
Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering, 49(5), 267-274.
doi:http://dx.doi.org/
@article{.,
	author = {Miloš  Pantoš and Ferdinand  Gubina},
	title = {Network Flow Tracing},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {49},
	number = {5},
	year = {2003},
	keywords = {transmission networks; flow tracing; distributed generation; line factors; nodal factors; },
	abstract = {In the developed world, people’s demands are increasing rapidly. The main problem is to find appropriate ways of supplying the consumption centres with the goods that are produced in distant production units. The main criteria are the preservation of the quality of the transacted goods and the minimization of the transmission losses, and both of these are affected by economic aspects, such as minimising costs. In an attempt to solve these problems, mankind has built transmission networks, such as pipelines, gas networks, heat networks and electrical power networks. At first sight the question of which producer supplies a particular consumer seems to be very trivial, but nowadays, with rapid developments, transmission networks are becoming more sophisticated, i.e. more complex, meshed and widespread. In this paper a new network-flow-tracing method is presented. The major goal of this new method is to define flow paths from producers to consumers across a network. In the past a few methods were already proposed; however, this method is based on a matrix calculation. Although it considers the transmission losses, it is still very simple to understand and also very fast. The new approach was tested on the New England test power system. Since all transmission systems have some common characteristics, knowledge from one engineering field could probably be used in other fields. The idea is to spread the knowledge and to find some of the basic principles of observed phenomena that will enable us to solve problems in a proper manner. In this way, a better insight into the system operation and control can be obtained, especially nowadays when deregulation and liberalization of transmission systems are being introduced.},
	issn = {0039-2480},	pages = {267-274},	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/}
}
Pantoš, M.,Gubina, F.
2003 July 49. Network Flow Tracing. Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering. [Online] 49:5
%A Pantoš, Miloš 
%A Gubina, Ferdinand 
%D 2003
%T Network Flow Tracing
%B 2003
%9 transmission networks; flow tracing; distributed generation; line factors; nodal factors; 
%! Network Flow Tracing
%K transmission networks; flow tracing; distributed generation; line factors; nodal factors; 
%X In the developed world, people’s demands are increasing rapidly. The main problem is to find appropriate ways of supplying the consumption centres with the goods that are produced in distant production units. The main criteria are the preservation of the quality of the transacted goods and the minimization of the transmission losses, and both of these are affected by economic aspects, such as minimising costs. In an attempt to solve these problems, mankind has built transmission networks, such as pipelines, gas networks, heat networks and electrical power networks. At first sight the question of which producer supplies a particular consumer seems to be very trivial, but nowadays, with rapid developments, transmission networks are becoming more sophisticated, i.e. more complex, meshed and widespread. In this paper a new network-flow-tracing method is presented. The major goal of this new method is to define flow paths from producers to consumers across a network. In the past a few methods were already proposed; however, this method is based on a matrix calculation. Although it considers the transmission losses, it is still very simple to understand and also very fast. The new approach was tested on the New England test power system. Since all transmission systems have some common characteristics, knowledge from one engineering field could probably be used in other fields. The idea is to spread the knowledge and to find some of the basic principles of observed phenomena that will enable us to solve problems in a proper manner. In this way, a better insight into the system operation and control can be obtained, especially nowadays when deregulation and liberalization of transmission systems are being introduced.
%U https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/
%0 Journal Article
%R 
%& 267
%P 8
%J Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
%V 49
%N 5
%@ 0039-2480
%8 2017-07-07
%7 2017-07-07
Pantoš, Miloš, & Ferdinand  Gubina.
"Network Flow Tracing." Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], 49.5 (2003): 267-274. Web.  27 Jan. 2021
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pantoš, Miloš 
AU  - Gubina, Ferdinand 
PY  - 2003
TI  - Network Flow Tracing
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - transmission networks; flow tracing; distributed generation; line factors; nodal factors; 
N2  - In the developed world, people’s demands are increasing rapidly. The main problem is to find appropriate ways of supplying the consumption centres with the goods that are produced in distant production units. The main criteria are the preservation of the quality of the transacted goods and the minimization of the transmission losses, and both of these are affected by economic aspects, such as minimising costs. In an attempt to solve these problems, mankind has built transmission networks, such as pipelines, gas networks, heat networks and electrical power networks. At first sight the question of which producer supplies a particular consumer seems to be very trivial, but nowadays, with rapid developments, transmission networks are becoming more sophisticated, i.e. more complex, meshed and widespread. In this paper a new network-flow-tracing method is presented. The major goal of this new method is to define flow paths from producers to consumers across a network. In the past a few methods were already proposed; however, this method is based on a matrix calculation. Although it considers the transmission losses, it is still very simple to understand and also very fast. The new approach was tested on the New England test power system. Since all transmission systems have some common characteristics, knowledge from one engineering field could probably be used in other fields. The idea is to spread the knowledge and to find some of the basic principles of observed phenomena that will enable us to solve problems in a proper manner. In this way, a better insight into the system operation and control can be obtained, especially nowadays when deregulation and liberalization of transmission systems are being introduced.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/
@article{{}{.},
	author = {Pantoš, M., Gubina, F.},
	title = {Network Flow Tracing},
	journal = {Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering},
	volume = {49},
	number = {5},
	year = {2003},
	doi = {},
	url = {https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/}
}
TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pantoš, Miloš 
AU  - Gubina, Ferdinand 
PY  - 2017/07/07
TI  - Network Flow Tracing
JF  - Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering; Vol 49, No 5 (2003): Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering
DO  - 
KW  - transmission networks, flow tracing, distributed generation, line factors, nodal factors, 
N2  - In the developed world, people’s demands are increasing rapidly. The main problem is to find appropriate ways of supplying the consumption centres with the goods that are produced in distant production units. The main criteria are the preservation of the quality of the transacted goods and the minimization of the transmission losses, and both of these are affected by economic aspects, such as minimising costs. In an attempt to solve these problems, mankind has built transmission networks, such as pipelines, gas networks, heat networks and electrical power networks. At first sight the question of which producer supplies a particular consumer seems to be very trivial, but nowadays, with rapid developments, transmission networks are becoming more sophisticated, i.e. more complex, meshed and widespread. In this paper a new network-flow-tracing method is presented. The major goal of this new method is to define flow paths from producers to consumers across a network. In the past a few methods were already proposed; however, this method is based on a matrix calculation. Although it considers the transmission losses, it is still very simple to understand and also very fast. The new approach was tested on the New England test power system. Since all transmission systems have some common characteristics, knowledge from one engineering field could probably be used in other fields. The idea is to spread the knowledge and to find some of the basic principles of observed phenomena that will enable us to solve problems in a proper manner. In this way, a better insight into the system operation and control can be obtained, especially nowadays when deregulation and liberalization of transmission systems are being introduced.
UR  - https://www.sv-jme.eu/article/network-flow-tracing/
Pantoš, Miloš, AND Gubina, Ferdinand.
"Network Flow Tracing" Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering [Online], Volume 49 Number 5 (07 July 2017)

Authors

Affiliations

  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Slovenia
  • University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Slovenia

Paper's information

Strojniški vestnik - Journal of Mechanical Engineering 49(2003)5, 267-274

In the developed world, people’s demands are increasing rapidly. The main problem is to find appropriate ways of supplying the consumption centres with the goods that are produced in distant production units. The main criteria are the preservation of the quality of the transacted goods and the minimization of the transmission losses, and both of these are affected by economic aspects, such as minimising costs. In an attempt to solve these problems, mankind has built transmission networks, such as pipelines, gas networks, heat networks and electrical power networks. At first sight the question of which producer supplies a particular consumer seems to be very trivial, but nowadays, with rapid developments, transmission networks are becoming more sophisticated, i.e. more complex, meshed and widespread. In this paper a new network-flow-tracing method is presented. The major goal of this new method is to define flow paths from producers to consumers across a network. In the past a few methods were already proposed; however, this method is based on a matrix calculation. Although it considers the transmission losses, it is still very simple to understand and also very fast. The new approach was tested on the New England test power system. Since all transmission systems have some common characteristics, knowledge from one engineering field could probably be used in other fields. The idea is to spread the knowledge and to find some of the basic principles of observed phenomena that will enable us to solve problems in a proper manner. In this way, a better insight into the system operation and control can be obtained, especially nowadays when deregulation and liberalization of transmission systems are being introduced.

transmission networks; flow tracing; distributed generation; line factors; nodal factors;